Download Horin: Comparative Studies in Japanese Culture: Special by Talmo Aoyama (ed) PDF

By Talmo Aoyama (ed)

The contributions to this quantity are the results of a world symposium at the function of good judgment in Buddhism held on the jap (EKO) tradition middle within the urban of Düsseldorf/Germany in autumn 2003.

Gregor Paul: creation • Klaus Glashoff: utilizing formulation for the translation of historic Indian good judgment • Claus Oetke: during which feel are Indian theories of inference non-monotonic? • Gregor Paul: good judgment in Buddhist texts. With specific connection with the Zhonglun • Takashi Iwata: at the thought of necessity in Buddhist texts – from the views of the Yogācāras and the Buddhist logical culture • Tom J. F. Tillemans: The gradual demise of the trairūpya in Buddhist good judgment: A propos of Sa skya Pandita • Pascale Hugon: Interpretations of the trairūpya in Tibet • Shoryu Katsura: Paksa, Sapaksa and Asapaksa in Dignāga’s good judgment • Helmut Krasser: Are Buddhist Pramānavādins non-Buddhistic? Dignāga and Dharmakīrti at the effect of common sense and epistemology on emancipation • Birgit Kellner: First common sense, then the Buddha? the debate concerning the bankruptcy series of Dharmakīrti’s Pramānavārttika and the soteriological relevance of inference • Volker Beeh: Argument and common sense within the 8th bankruptcy of Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikās and in Candrakīrti’s observation • Shinya Moriyama: Is the facts of the omniscient Buddha attainable? • Eli Franco: Xuanzang’s evidence of idealism (vijñaptimātratā) • Annette L. Heitmann: perception into fact (tattvajñāna) as outlined in sixth century Indian Madhyamaka

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Horin: Comparative Studies in Japanese Culture: Special Issue, Buddhist Logic

The contributions to this quantity are the results of a world symposium at the position of good judgment in Buddhism held on the jap (EKO) tradition middle within the urban of Düsseldorf/Germany in autumn 2003.

Gregor Paul: creation • Klaus Glashoff: utilizing formulation for the translation of old Indian good judgment • Claus Oetke: within which feel are Indian theories of inference non-monotonic? • Gregor Paul: common sense in Buddhist texts. With specific connection with the Zhonglun • Takashi Iwata: at the proposal of necessity in Buddhist texts – from the views of the Yogācāras and the Buddhist logical culture • Tom J. F. Tillemans: The sluggish dying of the trairūpya in Buddhist good judgment: A propos of Sa skya Pandita • Pascale Hugon: Interpretations of the trairūpya in Tibet • Shoryu Katsura: Paksa, Sapaksa and Asapaksa in Dignāga’s common sense • Helmut Krasser: Are Buddhist Pramānavādins non-Buddhistic? Dignāga and Dharmakīrti at the impression of common sense and epistemology on emancipation • Birgit Kellner: First common sense, then the Buddha? the talk in regards to the bankruptcy series of Dharmakīrti’s Pramānavārttika and the soteriological relevance of inference • Volker Beeh: Argument and common sense within the 8th bankruptcy of Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikās and in Candrakīrti’s remark • Shinya Moriyama: Is the facts of the omniscient Buddha attainable? • Eli Franco: Xuanzang’s evidence of idealism (vijñaptimātratā) • Annette L. Heitmann: perception into fact (tattvajñāna) as outlined in sixth century Indian Madhyamaka

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Extra resources for Horin: Comparative Studies in Japanese Culture: Special Issue, Buddhist Logic

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28, Weinmayr 1989, Shimomura 1 990, p . 376, Becker 1 9 9 1 , Hofstede 1 993, p. 1 96, PortnerlHeise 1 995, p. 136 and 1 80, Frankenhau­ ser 1 996, Wolfgang Welsch, Frankfurter Rundschau, 3rd of September 1 996, Detlef Horster, Frankfurter Rundschau, l I th of January 1 997, GarfieldJPriest 2003 , and many others. , Sturm 1 996. 40 Gregor Paul: Logic in Buddhist texts. With particular reference to the Zhonglun In my discussion, I argue that all these hypotheses are mistaken. As far as these hy potheses exclude the kind of logic which I have in mind, they refer to concepts or systems that are per se no candidates for universal validity, and are thus simply not concerned with, and not relevant to, the question of how Buddhist texts evaluate formal non-contradiction, logically valid forms of inference, etc.

Non-emptiness cannot be expressed. Both, and neither, cannot be expressed. 49 Borin 1112004 They are discussed merely as conventional names. ) Strictly speaking, (the ontological notion of) emptiness differs from (the epis­ temological notion of) ultimate truth. B ut suppose, the word "emptiness" re­ fers to the truth that all dharmas are empty, and thus to ultimate truth. Then, "non-emptiness" would refer to conventional truth. Accordingly, the Zhong­ lun would not distinguish between the expressability of the two kinds of truth.

Jiandi) It is only severed by meditation (Chin. siwei }i�t'lt , Skt. bhavana­ [margaJ) By virtue of this non-disappearing dharma All actions have their rewards. 2o Ji'.. ) ,, Walleser translates siwei (Skt. bhavana) by "practical truth, 21 Weber­ ,, 22 Brosamer and Back translate the Sanskrit term by "practice, Kalupahana ,, ,, by "cultivation, 23 Inada by "virtuous practical actions . 24 In any case, the stanza seems 'to state that salvation cannot be realized by mere insight, but also requires respective practice.

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